Introduction

Description

Renga developed in Japan during the Heian (794-1185) and Muromachi (1333-1573) periods as a collective form of poetry. The communal writing is governed by a strict set of rules that bind the participating poets and their actions. At the core is the vital principle of ‘disjunctive linking’ that provides a cadence of connection and invention subverting the authority of a single isolated creator to demonstrate the multivalent interconnections between people and material.

This workshop will translate renga from a poetic form of writing into a dynamic design/build practice. As a model of collective interaction renga is truly an experiment in the making. Its outcome cannot be known in advance, only anticipated. It is a model of collective action without requiring consensus.

 

Structure

This workshop will consist of a four and one half hour design experiment made by twelve individuals. Renga will provide the frame for our work, the operating mechanism and rules of our action. Each participant will construct three ten minute moves during the construction period. The construction will be governed by the following rules:

1. Participants will contribute to the collective composition establishing their interpretation of the theme through making.

2. Each participant will complete one move within the allotted time (ten minutes). There will be three autonomous tracks of eighteen moves each.

3. Each move is to follow the principle of ’disjunctive linking.’

4. “(T)he linking made in such a way that any two consecutive parts must make an intelligible whole, but three may not. {AB, BC, CD, but not ABC, BCDE, DEF, and so on} It is collaborative poetry with ‘disjunctive linking.’” From Hiroaki Sato, One Hundred Frogs: From renga to haiku to English (New York: John Weatherhill, Inc. 1983).

5. Each move will add to or modify the composition.

6. Moves will add at least one aspect from the dimensional world to the developing collage. Material within the composition is available for appropriation.

7. Each move will conclude with the participant creating two digital images that document their action; one including the work in its entirety, the other a detail of choice.

 

Theme

Dimensional translation.

 

Resources

Materials: Found or created images, type, artifacts of any scope are permitted. Tools: of connection for direct or transparent overlay, of analog and digital cutting, and for documentation and capture (cameras, scanners, recorders).

 

Schedule

22 March 2013 / 54 Moves between 11:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Introduction / setup : 10:30 AM

Conclusion / wrap-up discussion : 3:30 PM


 

A#

Time

 

Maker

B#

Time

 

Maker

 Renga A  Renga B

10:30 AM

-

Intro

1a

11:00 AM

-

Sydney

1b

11:00 AM

-

Dylan

2a

11:10 AM

-

Abbie

2b

11:10 AM

-

Gwen

3a

11:20 AM

-

Chris

3b

11:20 AM

-

Sam

4a

11:30 AM

-

Susan

4b

11:30 AM

-

Shelby

5a

11:40 AM

-

Laurent

5b

11:40 AM

-

Lance

6a

11:50 AM

-

Kayla

6b

11:50 AM

-

Lindsay

7a

12:00 PM

-

Susan

7b

12:00 PM

-

Shelby

8a

12:10 PM

-

Abbie

8b

12:10 PM

-

Gwen

9a

12:20 PM

-

Laurent

9b

12:20 PM

-

Lance

10a

12:30 PM

-

Chris

10b

12:30 PM

-

Sam

11a

12:40 PM

-

Kayla

11b

12:40 PM

-

Lindsay

12a

12:50 PM

-

Sydney

12b

12:50 PM

-

Dylan

1:00 PM

Lunch

13a

2:30 PM

-

Chris

13b

2:30 PM

-

Shelby

14a

2:40 PM

-

Abbie

14b

2:40 PM

-

Dylan

15a

2:50 PM

-

Kayla

15b

2:50 PM

-

Lindsay

16a

3:00 PM

-

Laurent

16b

3:00 PM

-

Gwen

17a

3:10 PM

-

Susan

17b

3:10 PM

-

Sam

18a

3:20 PM

-

Abbie

18b

3:20 PM

-

Lance

3:30 PM

-

Wrap

4:00 PM

-

Conclude

 

Participants

Workshop director: Chris Taylor, architect, educator, and director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech University.

Renga A Participants:

Sydney Bordeaux

Abbie Winters

Chris Porter

Susan Liu

Laurent Rossi

Kayla Seabridge

 

Renga B Participants:

Dylan Halpern

Gwen Stinger

Sam Wittwer

Shelby Thompson

Lance Barrera

Lindsay Hattrick

Documentation

Renga A

Renga B

References

Cage, John. “Introduction to an Unpresented Text” in VIA 5, The Journal of the Graduate School of Fine Arts, University of Pennsylvania(Cambridge: MIT Press, 1982), pp 44-51.

Paz, Octavio. Renga: A chain of Poems by Octavio Paz, Jacques Roubaud, Edoardo Sanguineti, Charles Tomlinson (New York: George Braziller, 1971).

Sato, Hiroaki. One Hundred Frogs: From renga to haiku to english (New York: John Weatherhill, Inc. 1983).

Ulmer, Gregory. “The Euretics of Alice’s Valise,”Journal of Architectural Education 45/1(November 1991), pp 3-10.

 

University of Texas Renga, 2000.

University of Texas Renga, 2000.